Renovation

AN ENTIRELY NEW LOOK FOR CITY CENTER

Renderings have been surfaced for a massive renovation of one of Minneapolis’ tallest towers.

City Center, located at 33 S Sixth Street, is set to receive a large-scale renovation that would touch both the exterior and interior of the building. Leasing documents that have surfaced show that with the renovation a potential rebranding of the mall space could occur which would tentatively be called “CC33”.

Last year City Center 33 South Property LLC bought the 51-story building for a record $320 million dollars. With the purchase announcement the new owner stated that an extensive renovation of the building was in the works with the hopes that it would attract new retail tenants to fill some of the nearly 50,000 square feet of vacant retail space within the mall area. 

The renovation would bring a new modern look to the exterior base of the building transforming today’s non-active façade into a vibrant facade. Renderings within the leasing document show wood accents and metal work cladding the exterior of the building along with two spots for what appears to be digital signage opportunities. The interior would also receive updates to its look which might even include a pop-up wine bar within the large atrium space. And let’s be honest, a wine bar is sure to be an after work hit with the thousands of employees that work in the nearly 50 stories of office space within the building.

As with all projects renderings can always change so there is a chance that as tenants are secured or as more details are solidified in regards to the renovation that these images could change.

Colliers International has been selected as the real estate company who is in charge of securing new tenants for the vacant retail space. The project is managed by Ryan Companies and was designed by DLR Group

At the moment an official construction start date has yet to be announced.

 

NORTH LOOP'S DUFFY PAPER BUILDING COULD BECOME HOUSING

Domimium's proposal for 528 Washington Avenue N.

One of North Loop's last remaining large warehouses may soon see new life as housing.

The Duffy Paper building (528 Washington Avenue N) is one of the last remaining undeveloped properties located on Washington Avenue in the North Loop. The massive building once housed Duffy Paper's offices and production facilities, however in 2016 the business ceased operations within the building and since then it has sat largely vacant.

Plymouth based Dominium would be responsible for the new redevelopment of the building. Dubbed "Iron Store", that project would bring 200 affordable housing units to the North Loop. The project is unique in the fact that 100 percent units would be affordable units, something that the North Loop, one of the most expensive areas to live in Minneapolis, is greatly lacking.

THE PLANS

The large seven story building located at the corner of Washington Avenue and N 6th Avenue would have it's exterior restored and the interior converted into apartments. In addition, Dominium would renovate two additional 1916 warehouses located to the right of the Duffy Paper building into apartments with the grand total for apartments in all three buildings coming in around 140.

But wait, there's more.

Dominium also has plans for the vacant parking lot at the corner of the site at the intersection of Washington Avenue and N 5th Avenue. Plans for that site would include a new residential building that would also house affordable apartment units, about 60 in total, along with underground parking.

Dominium hopes to begin construction on the project in 2019 with an anticipated completion in 2021.

ABOUT DOMINIUM

Based out of Plymouth, MN, Dominium "is one of the nation’s largest and most innovative affordable housing development and management companies." They're no stranger to developing housing and affordable housing is one of their specialties. To top it off, they're skilled in restoring and reconfiguring historic buildings.

A-Mill Artist Lofts

A-Mill Artist Lofts

Take for example the A-Mill Artist Lofts, one of Dominium's projects that is within the historic Pillsbury mills located along the Mississippi River. Dominium converted that massive building and a few surrounding buildings from run down warehouses into a thriving artist community of 251 lofts. Best part? 100% of the units are affordable. The total project cost came in around $175,000,000, a huge investment for the neighborhood.

Schmidt Artist Lofts

Schmidt Artist Lofts

Another prime example of Dominium's expertise is the Schmidt Brewery. Completed in 2014, Dominium took that run down site and brought it back to it's former glory, converting the brewery into 247 loft apartments and 13 townhomes. The total investment? $130,000,000.

Those are just two local examples of Dominiums commitment to developing affordable housing. We can't wait to see what magic they work on the Duffy Paper building. 

 

DETAILS BEGIN TO EMERGE ON "THE DAYTON'S PROJECT"

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THE DAYTON'S PROJECT

There's a plan in store for the former Macy's flagship space located in Downtown Minneapolis on Nicollet Mall. Images of the planned project leaked a few weeks ago and now the developer, New York based 601W, plans to make those plans public tomorrow.

An article published by the Star Tribune Saturday evening gives a glimpse into what 601W and architecture firm, Gensler, have drafted up for the massive 1.3 million square feet of space. The redevelopment of the building will be spread across 12 different floors and will be located in three different buildings, the total of amount of space being just slightly less than the 57 story IDS Center across the street.


WHAT'S IN STORE

Plans for the project show the basement level and first floor of the building being devoted to public use, with the upper floors being devoted to office space.

The basement level would contain a large entertainment venue with a bowling alley (Dave and Buster's would be a perfect fit) along with a large food hall that would have space for over 20 vendors, some of which would rotate every few months, and a large retail space.

The ground floor is nearly entirely devoted to retail space with a few spaces for food and beverage service. A large retail space will anchor the corner of Nicollet Mall and Seventh Street and will be combinable with the retail space directly below on the basement level.

The upper levels would contain office space with single floors allowing for up to 90,000 square feet of continuous space, something that is rarely heard of in the office marketplace.

Amenity space will also be found on the upper levels of the building that will be available for use by the office tenants within the building. These spaces would include an outdoor rooftop park, a library, a nearly 10,000 square foot fitness center with locker rooms and showers, and more.


A DESTINATION FOR DOWNTOWN MINNEAPOLIS

Developers want to make The Dayton's Project a destination for Downtown Minneapolis.

They hope to bring people in not only by bringing in notable restaurants and retailers, but by also having the first food hall for Downtown Minneapolis, a trend that is sweeping the countries largest cities like New York, Miami, and Los Angeles, by storm.

In addition, there is a strong desire to keep the over century long life of the building alive. 601W plans salvage and preserve as much as possible of the most important and iconic pieces from the building's glory days as the Dayton's Department Store. In addition, the name itself of the project will help that legacy live on.

Plans for some of those iconic pieces, such the famous Oak Room, have yet to be solidified. The developers and architects for the project are working on multiple scenarios for that particular space, some of which would allow the Oak Room to be accessed by the public in its current location, others potentially deconstructing and reconstructing the room within a different space within the building. 

If all goes according to plan, The Dayton's Project's transformation from a vacant retail store to a vibrant downtown marketplace and destination could be complete by 2019.


RENOVATIONS TO BRING NEW OFFICE AND RESIDENTIAL BUILDING TO NORTH MINNEAPOLIS

An entire city block would be made new according to plans that will be presented to the City of Minneapolis' Planning Commission this week.  

The unique project proposed at 212 James Avenue N would make a run down warehouse into a brand new and unique office building. There's also plans for a six story, 150 unit apartment building that will be constructed on the northern half of the block where today a concrete cald warehouse stands. That building would be demolished to make way for the new residentiaul structure.


Current Warehouse on site | Minneapolis Planning Commission

THE OFFICE COMPONENT

The Leef, which is what the office component of this project will be called, will be a 2 story, 50,000 square foot commercial building.The targeted users of the building are large technology or design businesses. Developers estimate that in the future the businesses within the building could employ 200 or more individuals.

Designed by Twin Cities based Collage Architects, the project will take on a modern industrial vibe with large uses of exposed brick, metals, and other industrial components. An central atirum will divide the office building into two sections with the entrance being found on Currie Avenue W. 

The roof of the The Leef project will have two decks, one for the building and another that is for private tenant use. The top floor will also feature a glass enclosed meeting space for the building.

Overall the project is similar to The Broadway building in Northeast Minneapolis. That projectwas developed by First & First and is home to a number of local businesses including both office and retail along with the 612 Brewery on the ground floor. The Leef might just be The Broadway's distant cousin transplanted in North Minneapolis.


THE RESIDENTIAL COMPONENT

On the North side of the site a large portion an exisiting warehouse would be demolished and in its place a six story residential building would rise.

The building would be developed by Artspace, a national leader in developing live/work housing for artists and their families and would include a mixture of 1, 2, and 3 bedroom units. Parking would be included on both an underground level and the ground floor. On the ground floor one will also find the building's community room along with a studios and one bedrooms. Floors one through five would hold strictly residential units.

This residential building would provide new housing in area that really hasn't been hit by the construction boom that much of Minneapolis has experienced in the last five years. While this may be the first development for this area it likely will not be the last as there is adequate land in the surrounding for similar projects to be developed in the future.

The Leef development will go before the Minneapolis Planning Commission Committee of the Whole at tomorrow's meeting. If approved construction could begin this Summer with an anticipated completion in late 2018.


 

 

 

NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION: MONTAGE

A new development will soon grace the corner in Minneapolis' trendy Northeast neighborhood. Montage is now under construction.

Recently Schaefer Richardson completed their $1.9 million purchase of the former Nye's site clearing the way for construction to begin on their newest mixed use project, Montage. While you may not recognize the project by it's new name we're sure you're quite familiar with it already.

The project at 112 East Hennepin Avenue has remained in the headlines for nearly two years largely in part due to neighborhood opposition to the original plans for a 29 story mixed-use project. Area residents argued that the project was too large and would damage the historic church next door. There also was concern about the closure of Nye's Polonaise Room, a Minneapolis institute that had been in business for 66 years. 

Once it was confirmed that Nye's would close regardless, Schaefer Richardson worked with the community to develop a plan that would suite everyone's needs... flash forward a year and here we are.

THE PROJECT

Ground Floor of Montage

Once complete Montage will include 73 residential units and 8,000 square feet of ground floor retail. The project will also be one of the first in the Twin Cities to feature a garage with a unique elevator system that will allow cars to be "stacked," increasing the number of spaces available within the project.

Construction on the Montage is expected to last for about a year and a half with completion set for late Fall 2017. 

 

CPM plans residential project in Northeast

CPM Construction has revealed plans for their newest residential project within Minneapolis, this time in Northeast Minneapolis.

Located at 1301 Marshall Street NE, across the way from the iconic Grain Belt Brewery building, Marshall Flats will be a 6 story residential building with ground floor retail and 70 residential units.

The project will be located across from the Grain Belt, a residential project completed in 2014 that involved the renovation and restoration of the original Grain Belt offices into residential units. That development also left a large parcel of land on the corner as green space. Marshall Flats will "bookend" that green space with all three buildings creating a "courtyard" affect.

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The project would demolish a few buildings currently on site, while restoring a building located on Marshall Street. That building would house 3,200 square feet of commercial space with another 2,864 square foot retail space being available within the new building. The developers are looking for a restaurant to occupy that space.

The residential units within Marshall Flats will be one and two bedroom units and will be located on floors two through six. 

38 surface parking spaces will be located behind the L shaped building with 17 additional spaces located in a covered garage on the ground floor of the building. Residents will also have access to the management office, a community room, an exercise room, and a bike storage room on the ground floor. A rooftop deck will be included on what technically is the seventh floor.

If approved by the Planning Commission construction could begin in the Fall with an expected completion in Spring 2017.

 

New Horizon Academy planned for former Champions site

A vacant building on West Lake Street that formerly served pints to adults will soon be serving bottles to babies.

New Horizon Academy, founded in 1971, is a children's care center that is well known for a number of day programs they provide. The center provides educational programs for children as young as infants all the way to 4th graders. 

New Horizon has submitted plans to the Minneapolis Planning Commission for a new center at 103 West Lake Street. Champions Salon and Eatery was the most recent occupant of the building, however the restaurant closed in 2014 and the building has since then sat vacant.

Plans presented by New Horizon Academy include an extensive interior and exterior renovation and a 1,100 square foot expansion. Two outdoor play areas will be added, one for the toddlers, the other for early elementary age students. The building will be able to enroll 162 children.

If all is approved by the Planning Commission construction could begin in early Summer with plans for the center to open in November 2016.

 

Costco purchases warehouse for Minneapolis location

Costco in Rochester, MN  |  TDT Minneapolis

Costco in Rochester, MN | TDT Minneapolis

Your dreams of land where all things come in bulk and insane savings are found in every aisle is finally going to become reality as Costco is finally coming to Minneapolis. 

The new Minneapolis location will be located at 3311 Broadway St in what currently is a large warehouse style building that houses Immenia, a local graphics company that employs about 120 people. The 175,000 square foot building will be extensively renovated and open next year as Costco's NINTH Minnesota location.

While we are sure you couldn't be more excited for Costco to finally open in Minneapolis if you're rolling you eyes at another large retailer coming to the city, not to mention one that already has a presence in the metro, don't worry. This Costco will be a little different than the others in the state as it will fall under the company's Business Center model.

BUSINESS CENTER... WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

There's only a dozen in the country, so Minneapolis, consider yourself lucky.

"A warehouse unlike others and open to all Costco members" is how the company's website describes the business center model. The larger, more specified warehouses offer large selections of "high-quality food service, convenience store, and office supplies" to members. 

Don't fear this new business model if you're already a Costco lover. It'll still cater to the typical crowd of customers that include just about anyone who is looking to buy in bulk, but in addition that that crowd it will also cater the businesses themselves.

One of the ways that these "Business Center" locations cater to area businesses is not only by having 70% of the products be unique to the business center model (meaning they aren't found at a typical Costco location), but by also delivering the products. You can even order product by the pallet... or TRUCKLOAD.

Costco opened it's first business center in 1992 and has been rolling the concept out across the East and West Coasts for the last 20 years . This will be the second location for the Midwest, the first being in Bedford Park, IL, but more importantly it will also be one of the largest business centers in the country.

 

Pracna on Main to be reborn

 

On the night of January 6th the doors closed for what would be, unknowingly to most, the last time for yet another veteran restaurant in Minneapolis' Northeast Neighborhood; Pracna on Main.

Dubbed as the "oldest restaurant on the oldest street" Pracna has been in operation since 1973 and currently was under the ownership of John Ramarcik who also owns the adjacent St. Anthony Main movie theater. Ramarcik also has a few other restaurants under his belt within the city including Annie's Parlour and The Kitty Cat Klub, both of which are in the nearby Dinkytown neighborhood.

The city went into a bit of a fret when Pracna simply just closed up shop with no warning. Social media accounts and their website all vanished and it seemed as if the end had arrived for Pracna without any notice. That didn't make sense though. How could such a successful place in such a successful district (not to mention a place with such repertoire) go belly up without any forewarning? The answer... It didn't.

Turns out there's actually new life planned for Pracna. The owners plan to reopen this spring with not only a newly remodeled space to show off, but also a new menu featuring barbecue, salads, and even breakfast. Patrons will also notice a larger Pracna on Main as the new restaurant space will be 6,500 square foot after a 2,000 square foot expansion into neighboring space is completed.

Another change? Restaurant goers will be able to take their drinks into the neighboring move theater. The ultimate convenience? We think so. 

The new Pracna on Main, which will resemble much of the old Pracna on Main, will be managed by current owners of the neighboring Aster Cafe when it opens come Spring.